January 2024 Newsletter

What is Ahead in the 2024 Legislative Session

Starting February 7th

Abortion Extremism Comes Into Full View in Connecticut 

Connecticut Abortion Advocates Hope to Fully Legalize Late-Term Abortions in Connecticut. Their Theme is "Go Beyond Roe". 

Create Real School Choice in our State

Legislators call for Expanding School Choice

Legalizing Physician-Assisted Suicide is on the Agenda Again

Once again the newspapers are being filled by stories of the need to allow Connecticut residents the right to end their own lives when faced with a terminal illness.

Addressing the Housing and Homeless Problems

The legislature is once again expected to address the issues of affordable housing and homelessness in our state. Shelter is a basic human right.

January 2024


What is Ahead in the 2024 Legislative Session

Starting February 7th


Abortion Extremism Comes Into Full View in Connecticut 

Connecticut Abortion Advocates Hope to Fully Legalize Late-Term Abortions in Connecticut. Their Theme is "Go Beyond Roe". 

Gov. Ned Lamont, flanked by Lt. Gov. Susan
Bysiewicz, left, and state lawmakers during a ceremonial bill signing
in July 2023 at the State Capitol building  celebrating four bills on
reproductive and gender-affirming health care.  Ken Dixon/Hearst
Connecticut Media
 State Representative Jillian GilChrest (D-West Hartford), co-chair of the legislature's Reproductive Rights Caucus, called for the legalization of late-term abortions in Connecticut at a press conference on Monday, January 21st.  This would eliminate the current state law which allows, with a few exceptions, no abortions after viability, which is 24-26 weeks (six months).  

  On January 21st, abortion advocates, including legislators and the Secretary of State, held a press conference and declared Connecticut must further expand abortion rights in the state and "Go Beyond Roe". Connecticut has very few restrictions on abortions and the legislature's Reproductive Rights Caucus wants to see them all eliminated. They will be announcing their full legislative agenda in about a week. What may be on that list:

1) Allowing unrestricted abortion up until the time just before birth. Such abortions are rare, but they want this brutality legalized, with no restrictions.

2) A state constitutional  amendment guaranteeing a woman's right to abortion. Again, with no limits. To place the amendment on the 2024 ballot they must have a 3/4 majority in both the House and Senate. This may be an impediment to this effort. 

3) Further attacks on pro-life pregnancy care centers.

4) Removal of conscious protections for medical providers and facilities that do not perform abortions.

Join us at the 3rd annual Connecticut March for Life on March 20th at the State Capitol. For more information go to ctmarchforlife.org 


Create Real School Choice in our State

Legislators call for Expanding School Choice

This week legislators, State Rep. Thomas O’Dea, R- New Canaan, and State Rep. Rachel Chelski, R- Danbury, called on their fellow lawmakers to meet the 2018 commitment to fund a charter school in Danbury. They also called on creating a "money follows" the child program.

 “Every child deserves a choice in education,” said O’Dea, who noted that graduation rates for many non-public schools, hovers near 100 percent. “One size does not fit all the needs of our children.”

O’Dea and Chelski favor legislation that would allow state funding to “follow the child” where the per student state subsidy would be used to pay for the tuition for alternatives to public schools, which includes charter and or religious schools. If the subsidy more than covers the tuition cost, the balance of that subsidy would revert to the public school system.

Opposition to the expansion of charter schools and school choice initiatives has been led by public school teachers’ unions and other education advocates who do not want the competition or to be exposed for substandard instruction and results.

Click here to read more.


 Legalizing Physician-Assisted Suicide is on the Agenda Again

  Once again the newspapers are being filled by stories of the need to allow Connecticut residents the right to end their own lives when faced with a terminal illness. This process is officially called physician-assisted suicide by the American Medical Association, but referred to as aid-in-dying by those who support this option.

 The advocates and certain legislators are presenting this as an individual rights issue. In reality it is bad public policy and opens a pandora's box of potential abuses. The advocates say there is no record of abuses, but fail to mention that in states that have enacted this procedure there is no method for tracking abuses. It is hard for a patient to file a complaint, possibly against a family member, when they are dead. "Dead men tell no tales."

    Visit CTstopsuicide.org to learn more and for the most up-to-date information


Addressing the Housing and Homeless Problems

The legislature is once again expected to address the issues of affordable housing and homelessness in our state. Shelter is a basic human right. The solutions are not easy ones, but this year the Conference will be encouraging the legislature and Governor to continue and increase their efforts to meet these needs in our state. 

The Catholic bishops believe decent, safe, and affordable housing is a human right. Catholic teaching supports the right to private property, but recognizes that communities and the government have an obligation to ensure the housing needs of all are met, especially poor and vulnerable people and their families. In a time of rising homelessness and when many workers' wages are stagnant and living expenses are rising, it is important to ensure housing security. (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops)

Click here to read the Catholic Church's moral position on housing


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